Saturday, September 5, 2009

How we came to have so many Pomegranate plants

It's Saturday and Labor day is upon us. Mac is out in the garden with the tiller preparing the beds for our Pomegranate bushes. He is so proud of them, as he grew them himself this past spring, from seed. We laugh about the efforts from last year because he says I sabotaged him at every turn. See, he prepared this nice long planter with lovely compost and spread the pomegranate seed over it, then covered it with a layer of compost and set it next to the shed to get plenty of sunlight and make sure of water. That was February of 2008

I came along and saw this lovely planter of great looking dirt, went into the garden shed and got my little sack of Hibiscus seed I'd gathered. I took the trowel and worked up the the dirt, spread my seed and covered them gently with a blanket of potting mix. I sat back and admired my work.

In April, I was agog at all the hibiscus plants and wondered at Mac's constant comment that they didn't look much like pomegranates. I snickered, thinking "why would hibiscus look like pomegranate?" Out loud I said, "well if they looked like cotton plants or even okra plants I wouldn't be surprised. You know, since they are the same family?" He only gave me that "get out of here" look...you know the one. Later on it dawned on me that he really thought he had grown pomegranates. I wasn't sure how to tell him that he (we) had grown hibiscus. I mean, couldn't he tell from the leaves? Why did he keep going over to the planter and talking to himself?

I picked out spots all around the place where I wanted them to be planted. As we sat on the porch drinking our first cup of coffee, I brought up the identity crisis his pomegranate plants were having. "When did you plant your seed, then? You didn't mention it to me at the time, " I said (sipping carefully, eyes cutting to my right). He thought about it for a bit, then said to me, "you know I put them in there early February. I can't figure out why they look so much like cotton plants. " He shook his head, as though to clear that dark thought from his mind. I drew one leg under me, admiring the red nail polish on my toenails, nodded wisely and said, "that could be because someone overplanted your planter with hibiscus."

I think they heard his shout of "WHATTTTTTTTTTT?" clear into downtown Jefferson. I tried to explain that I had seen the planter, it was so nicely prepared and that I thought about how great it would be to propagate the lovely Hibiscus he had brought me from Alabama that I just went ahead and took it over. I never dreamed that he had planted a thing in it. Really!

Likely story. Yep, that was his answer! I swear, I didn't know the planter was loaded! Ummm...sort of puts me in mind of the old song, I Didn't know the Gun was Loaded. But it is the truth I tell you!

So anyway, there was a planter that sat mutely by the south wall of the shed
fresh compost had been added by the master of the house ONCE AGAIN. But now,
signs were stuck in beside it that dared the housemouse to TOUCH ONE GRAIN OF DIRT THEREIN! Signs like crucifixes were fixed to the pot as though I were a vampire and This Means You and GO AWAY proliferated the outer parameters. I looked at him in all innocence and once more insisted that I DIDN'T KNOW.

His answer? "This time you do!." Yes, I suppose I did! But anyway, I hope you are as proud of his endeavors as I am! Here they are. Not Hibiscus plants, but lovely well tended grown from seed Pomegranate bushes! Properly tended and transplanted into larger cells and ready to be put into the bed. He has green fingers, you see. All those years as a Sailor and who knew he was meant to be a farmer all along?

63 comments:

Denise said...

Now that is a great story! AND who knew that you could grow Pomegranates in your neck of the woods..... I just might find myself finding some old pots and filling them with rich gooey fertile soil and seeing how fast I can have a pomegranate harvest!

Cynthia said...

What a delightful spice of life story! I'm still smiling, Sandi. Your ex-sailor is as determined as any horticulturist to grow what everyone believes can't be done. I remember my sister growing a lemon tree from seed. I was impressed. I now grow avocados from seed but they grow directly in the pot. (Not the toothpick suspended over a glass of water method.) Love your storytelling style. I want to have my own Pomegranate tree! Do you think they would grow in the tropics? <3

Queenmothermamaw said...

Hello Sandi, found my way over here from somewhere. Can't remember after the page leaves my eyes. I enjoyed your story of the pomegranates. Sounds like HH and I. Pop over for a visit sometime. We are not too far away from each other. Have family in S.C.
QMM

Pondside said...

well Sandi, I step out for a bit and you blog like crazy!
I've had a good look around and enjoyed your last few posts - although, I must say that your face made me gasp!
I remember Betsy McCall and I too waited for the magazine to be finished so that I could cut out the doll and clothes. I had a lovely collection.
I smiled when I read your comment about your Good Sister and the call with the make, model, colour of car, name of man etc. In this business you learn - while I can't say I always have a guard up, I'm careful and always after my daughter to be careful too. I've learned a thing or two working with my clients!

Brian Miller said...

ha. love this story. little signs...lol. he seems to have done quite well this go around. thanks for the smiles.

Anya said...

Hi Sandy
Wonderful funny words ;)
Lovely to read .....
Have a great weekend
(Thanks for the ^___^)

Maggie May said...

That was so funny. I enjoyed that story very much.

Pomegranate plants would be hot house exotic plants over here but we can grow Hibiscus where I live.

Jeni said...

As always, I really enjoyed this post. Just too darned funny how you planted the hibiscus over his seeds. And I loved the warnings he posted to you this year too. Good thing you both have that good old sense of humor going for you -and your writing skills then to turn this into such a neat story.
Peace.

Akelamalu said...

Great story Sandi. Looks like you're both gardeners! :)

jabblog said...

Lovely story - it sounds as though you choose your moments carefully to reveal what might turn out to be an inconvenient truth ;-)

menopausaloldbag (MOB) said...

Oh I love Pomegranate, what a superb thing to grow. Poor chap, no wonder he was baffled! A terrific read Sandi.

Sally said...

hahahaha

Poor Mac, well now he has your number!!!

Great story, Sandi!!

Have a beautiful day. :)

Lee said...

Heh! Guess from now on ALL the seeded planters will have proper signs warning unsuspecting wives. LOL

Gorgeous bushe! Can't wait to see the much larger, fruit producing ones they will grow into! Hope you've got a sturdy juicer...or at least plan on getting one for Christmas.

Hugs!
Lee

♥ Boomer ♥ said...

I would love to see your garden!! I think I might sit there all day long!!!

Have a wonderful Labor Day weekend!!!

Boomer Baby Bliss

Kathy's Klothesline said...

Good lesson about labeling! I would have done the same thing if I encoutered some wonderful soil!

Kathy's Klothesline said...

Good lesson about labeling! I would have done the same thing if I encoutered some wonderful soil!

Strawberry Jam Anne said...

A great story Sandi - can just picture the scene! Your garden is going to look wonderful too with hibiscus as well! Look forward to seeing the flowers on both those and the pomegranates! A x

The Things We Carried said...

What a story :). What a guy! What a gardener :)!

Hilary said...

That's a wonderful story. Dueling gardeners! I can only imagine his face.

How are the hibiscus doing now?

Jeanne said...

haha That's a great story Sandi. Poor Mac. I can imagine him scratching his head over those planters and your Miss Inocent routine. LOL Glad you both got what you wanted.

NitWit1 said...

Great story: There are similar mis-communication stories at my house, too.

I learned to love pomegranates when I lived in Morocco. They were virtually free there as opposed to grocery store prices!

Pat@Back Porch Musings said...

Bravo to the Sailor/Farmer!

Thanks for coming by, Sandi. I really need to get out of the kitchen and do more visiting!!

Yes, there are definitely leftovers of the beef bourg...that's what's for supper, tonight!:-)

i beati said...

great story .. My neighbor 's pomegranate has one round piece of fruit on it and nothing else. mine have been eaten by vines..sandy

Sandi @the WhistleStop Cafe said...

You are so bad...
even if you don't mean to be :-)

Sandi @the WhistleStop Cafe said...

I've been enjoying your music playlist all morning while blog hopping... thanks!

Country Cottage Chic said...

Just thought I'd pop in & say hello! Long time no chat - but summer & holidays does that to us doesn't it?

Jayne

Kat said...

Poor Mac! Your "badness" sure made for a fun read though. Hehehe!

Hugs!
Kat

jay said...

Oh no!! I bet he was so mad with you! I would be! LOL!

I am envious. I love pomegranates and they're expensive here. Not only that, but they're often past their best when they do end up on the shelves. I can't imagine how much better a truly fresh pomegranate must taste!

Southern Drawl said...

Funny story...very funny...

Anna said...

Oh Sandi I wish we had a weather to grow the Pomegranate, it is my favorite fruit of all times, I fell in love with it the day I found out about its existence. Anna :)

tlc illustration said...

Hahahaha! Funny story. Wish we could grow pomegranates here. It's just not quite warm enough. :-( (hibiscus either).

Trubes said...

That was so funny Sandi,
You really tell a good tale, gave me a good, Monday morning laugh.
The weather has been very wet here for weeks but as soon as I started laughing...
Lo and behold...outcame the sun.

See you've radiated some sunshine into the UK, at last!
I've got a couple of posts'up about The Beatles and the Liverpool scene in the sixties, hope you have time to visit.

Di.x

Daryl said...

A delightful read and now you have me wanting a pom!

Candy said...

What a hoot! Loved the story of the lady gardener who thinks all nice pots are just waiting for HER seed! Next he may draw a line down the middle of the yard...his side, her side!

Shrinky said...

Oooooooh, such a wonderfully believable and totally understandable tale - teehee! I know exactly where you were coming from there - why waste such a perfectly inviting spot - how were you to know??

I buy (very expensive, imported) pomegranites every week.. you have encouraged me to sacrifice one of them for their seeds to my greenhouse. I am serious. Watch this spot!

Carver said...

I ejoyed this post so much. You are a wonderful storyteller. Thanks for stopping by my blog and my appointment did go well.

Mary Isabella and Kiley too! said...

I love this story!! it brightened my day...m..

Vee said...

So funny! I had to read it aloud to folks here. We're all chuckling. They are beautiful plants...Mac's. I'm sure that the hibiscus was beautiful, too. I must try that admiring of the toenail polish trick of yours. I've got a few things to reveal myself and may need to buy some time.

Brenda Eason said...

I have no clue how i lost you except when my page went down and I had to start over. so glad I seen you on Kat's page. Much catching up to do.
hope you are feeling well.
Brenda

Merisi said...

I am giggling here at 5am in the morning (yeah, early bird hits the dirt, er, reads about great looking dirt), wondering where the hibiscus plants are about right now! What wonderful story! Congratulations to your sailor on his farmer's skills and to both of you for your sense of humor.

About an hour by boat from Venice, in the Venetian Lagoon, on the small island of Torricello I know an orchard with pomegranate bushes (it belongs to the famous Cipriani family). They have the lovliest blossoms in spring.

Wishing you a wonderful September in your garden,
hugs,
Merisi

Shadow said...

yikes! what you gonna do with all them plants??? would make terrific gifts you know. can i send you my address, heee heee heeee

Rhoda @ Southern Hospitality said...

Hi, Sandi, thanks for stopping by to see me. You and Mac are still planting away out there in the country. My hubby really got into growing veggies this year & just planted him some collard greens.

Have a happy week!

Cheffie-Mom said...

How wonderful! enJOY your day!

Protege said...

What a beautiful place; I love gardening and I love plants, so this post was wonderful to read.
Thank you for taking the time to read my nominated post; I know you are a veteran in that depertment and have a splendid talent in writing.
xo

Dr.John said...

Joy postponed is joy enlarged.

david mcmahon said...

Tell Mac he AND a certain authorblogger were BOTH meant to be farmers .....

Mickle in NZ said...

So now you have Hibicus And Pomegranates! I doubt either would grow at my place.

(btw - washing machine fixed so can spin salad greens and fresh herbs again, lol)

care and huggles from us, Michelle and Zebbycat

Lee said...

Congratulations on making David's list today Sandi! Well deserved!

Hugs!
Lee

RuneE said...

Blue oceans and green fingers go together well - and congrats withthe POTD-mention!

pinkfairygran said...

Well, I doubt you will read me at the end of this humongous list of comments, but just to thank you for looking in on my small effort of a blog and leaving a comment.
And actually, still a bit blue as I have just returned from the doctor's surgery where I was told I had strained/sprained the ligaments in my left ankle... oh, so that's what this excruciating pain for the last week is?? So now it's off to develop a close relationship with a bag of frozen peas, pop pain killers and rest my poor foot... the other will feel neglected!

Donna said...

...God how funny Girl...Just what I needed!!!Hahahaaa...hughugs

Kanak Hagjer said...

A great read Sandi...love the look of your blog! I must come here often....Thank you for stopping by for mentioning the POTD today. And congrats to you too! Cheers!

CatHerder said...

I have never had a pomegranite or a hibiscus!!! I should try next year.....and yes cracker barrel was good...i was in awe with all the fall stuff in the store...working this new position at work, new hours is KILLLLING me...i cant seem to get anything accomplished at home and im completely stressed....i miss being the "happy homemaker" :-(

SandyCarlson said...

You were an unwitting saboteur! That is a funny story. Squatter's rights? May the best vegetation win? Hmm....

pinkfairygran said...

Hi again,
Thanks for visiting my other blog, tales from a norfolk village. You mentioned Blackpool, which I used to know really well as I worked there in the 1960s - '66-'69. I loved the place, and even up to the early 80s I still loved it for its gaudiness and kitschness too. Then it went into decline, and I haven't been back since.

Deb said...

So much fun to read this post! It certainly made me laugh loudly - and hats off to Mac on his green thumb! Wish he lived closer - I could use his help around here! And may the Hibiscus and Pomegranates live happily ever after!

San said...

Sandi, I read this post when it was first up. When I went to comment, my DSL connection bit the dust. And so I'm back. A profusion of pomegranates is yours, milady. It seems like everything in your neck of the woods takes root and takes off like magic. Would you believe the gophers finally took out our velvety black-purple hollyhocks too? We do console ourselves with the butterfly bushes and the hummingbird mint, the lavender and the snapdragons.

SandyCarlson said...

Thanks for your visits and comments, kind friend.

imbeingheldhostage said...

Oh Sandi-- that is hilarious!!!

Sally said...

Sandi - I'm a minute from going out of town, but couldn't find your email. Im having a giveaway in memory of Ben; if you could "blurb" this for us, it would really be appreciated. Love ya, girl. ((hugs))

lailani said...

lol! Cute story, almost like the gift of the maji, well, a stretch of an almost

Smiles!

gaelikaa said...

Oh, the confusion!!!

Lynn@ The Vintage Nest said...

Oh my...Sandi, I laughed so hard at your story. As for me, I would drop my teeth if I saw a freshly potted anything around here by someone other than myself. For you see, that is just not Bobby G's thing. When I ask him to dig a hole for a new plant I have bought he digs about 3 inches down and 3 inches wide and ask if that is big enough. Sheesh! I think this is the first time I have heard of anyone growing pomegranate plants. Please keep us informed as to how they do. xo